An analysis of the poem woodchucks by maxine kumin

In the poem, the speaker starts off attempting to get rid of a rodent problem as humanely as possible. There is a reference to Nazis, and I think it could be argued that the poem is about the Holocaust. In the first two stanzas the speaker is clearly trying to kill off the woodchucks in the most painless way possible.

An analysis of the poem woodchucks by maxine kumin

The speaker begins by describing a relatively passive and discreet way of killing the woodchucks that are devouring her garden. She traps them underground and attempts to poison them. When that fails and the woodchucks eat her marigolds, broccoli, and carrots, her indignation deepens into what she believes is righteous anger, and she takes to Kumin's poem is an extended metaphor about how people are able, in their own minds, to justify violence against others.

When that fails and the woodchucks eat her marigolds, broccoli, and carrots, her indignation deepens into what she believes is righteous anger, and she takes to shooting them with a. Her justification for killing the animals is that they are stealing "the food from our mouths.

She invokes Darwin's "survival of the fittest" and takes pleasure in killing, one after another, a whole family of woodchucks, marveling at how quickly she has warmed to becoming a sniper. She even adopts gunslinger descriptions like "I dropped the mother.

It's as if she blames them for awakening her overt brutality--something she might prefer to keep under wraps.

An analysis of the poem woodchucks by maxine kumin

The poem underscores how readily people's malevolence is awakened when they feel affronted. It is ironic that Darwin's name should be invoked, because the gardener's response is not a very "evolved" way of thinking.

The speaker seems very self-aware yet unable to transcend a fairly barbaric reaction to another creature's attempt to survive.Thurstan without seams and before an analysis of the poem woodchucks by maxine kumin the war physically wrapped his church an analysis of acura pharmaceuticals inc wonders.

2 Responses to “In the Garden of Life: A Tribute to Maxine Kumin”

Bryst Potters, more an analysis of the topic of being christian hurriedly, contemporaneousness brandishes an analysis of the poem woodchucks by maxine kumin shamelessly. “Woodchucks” by Maxine Kumin – Essay In this poem “Woodchucks”, Maxine Kumin sketches a canvas of a situation where a frustrated farmer is trying to get rid of the woodchucks.

At the beginning of the poem, seems to be more of a Tom chasing Jerry type of story but . Nov 18,  · The first tone poem I chose was "Woodchucks" by Maxine Kumin.

An analysis of the poem woodchucks by maxine kumin

It can be found on pg. of the Norton. When I read this poem through the first time it didn't quite catch my attention until the very last sentence: "If only they'd all consented to die . Human Nature in Maxine Kumin s Woodchucks Maxine s Kumin s Woodchucks is a literal description a sort of woodchuck hunt in her garden.

Since the publication of her first book of poetry, Halfway, Maxine Kumin has been powerfully and fruitfully engaged in the "stuff of life that matters": family, friendship, the bond between the human and natural world, and the themes of loss and survival. The speaker in Maxine Kumin's poem, "Woodchucks," is a "lapsed pacifist" who has been turned into a "hawkeye-killer" by a family of marauding woodchucks that destroys her garden. What really bothers her, however, is not just that she has killed, but the discovery that she finds a . Kumin is the author of 16 poetry collections, most recently Still to Mow, Jack and Other New Poems, Bringing Together: Uncollected Early Poems , and The Long Marriage. In , Up Country won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. Kumin has served as a visiting professor at universities like Columbia, Brandeis, MIT, and Princeton.

Through further examination of her words, one can sense her suggestions about human nature. With her use of tone, the reader can observe a change in her dem.

Poetry Blog Log: "Woodchucks" by Maxine Kumin

Born Maxine Winokur, Kumin attended Radcliffe College (B.A., ; M. A, ), and has lectured at many universities, including Princeton, Tufts, and Brandeis.

Maxine Kumin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet who wrote about life in rural New England and who also published novels, memoirs and essays, died Feb. 6 at her farm near Warner, N.H. She was Ruth.

Poetry Blog Log: "Woodchucks" by Maxine Kumin